Who Owned the Helmet Worn by Bowe Bergdahl in the 2009 Taliban Propaganda Video?

Video news report on deserter Bergdahl –  “….leaving his body armor, weapon, and helmet behind.”

So who owned the helmet he’s wearing in the picture below?

Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, right, seen in a December 2009 Taliban propaganda video, was released Saturday. His father Bob Bergdahl, left, actively campaigned for his release.

Sgt. (sic) Bowe Bergdahl, right, seen in a December 2009 Taliban propaganda video, was released Saturday. His father Bob Bergdahl, left, actively campaigned for his release. usnews.com

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06.02.14

We Lost Soldiers in the Hunt for Bergdahl, a Guy Who Walked Off in the Dead of Night

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For five years, soldiers have been forced to stay silent about the disappearance and search for Bergdahl. Now we can talk about what really happened.

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It was June 30, 2009, and I was in the city of Sharana, the capitol of Paktika province in Afghanistan. As I stepped out of a decrepit office building into a perfect sunny day, a member of my team started talking into his radio. “Say that again,” he said. “There’s an American soldier missing?”

There was. His name was Private First Class Bowe Bergdahl, the only prisoner of war in the Afghan theater of operations. His release from Taliban custody on May 31 marks the end of a nearly five-year-old story for the soldiers of his unit, the 1st Battalion, 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment. I served in the same battalion in Afghanistan and participated in the attempts to retrieve him throughout the summer of 2009. After we redeployed, every member of my brigade combat team received an order that we were not allowed to discuss what happened to Bergdahl for fear of endangering him. He is safe, and now it is time to speak the truth.

And that the truth is: Bergdahl was a deserter, and soldiers from his own unit died trying to track him down.

Video screenshot
Nathan Bradley Bethea joins CNN to elaborate on Bowe Bergdahl’s desertion.

On the night prior to his capture, Bergdahl pulled guard duty at OP Mest, a small outpost about two hours south of the provincial capitol. The base resembled a wagon circle of armored vehicles with some razor wire strung around them. A guard tower sat high up on a nearby hill, but the outpost itself was no fortress. Besides the tower, the only hard structure that I saw in July 2009 was a plywood shed filled with bottled water. Soldiers either slept in poncho tents or inside their vehicles.

The next morning, Bergdahl failed to show for the morning roll call. The soldiers in 2nd Platoon, Blackfoot Company discovered his rifle, helmet, body armor and web gear in a neat stack. He had, however, taken his compass. His fellow soldiers later mentioned his stated desire to walk from Afghanistan to India.

The Daily Beast’s Christopher Dickey later wrote that “[w]hether Bergdahl…just walked away from his base or was lagging behind on a patrol at the time of his capture remains an open and fiercely debated question.”

Not to me and the members of my unit.

Make no mistake: Bergdahl did not “lag behind on a patrol,” as was cited in news reports at the time. There was no patrol that night. Bergdahl was relieved from guard duty, and instead of going to sleep, he fled the outpost on foot. He deserted. I’ve talked to members of Bergdahl’s platoon—including the last Americans to see him before his capture. I’ve reviewed the relevant documents. That’s what happened.

thedailybeast.com

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Nathan Bradley Bethea, a member of his battalion, stated above that:

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“The soldiers in 2nd Platoon, Blackfoot Company discovered his rifle, helmet, body armor and web gear in a neat stack. He had, however, taken his compass…”

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One is prompted to question where he got the helmet pictured in the Taliban propaganda pictured above? If it wasn’t his assigned helmet, one can only hope it didn’t come from one of his unit buddies, who were killed by the Taliban in their atttempts to find him.

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