Doctor treats Ebola with HIV drug in Liberia — seemingly successfully (photographic history March-Octover 2014))

(CNN) — A doctor in rural Liberia inundated with Ebola patients says he’s had good results with a treatment he tried out of sheer desperation: an HIV drug.

Dr. Gorbee Logan has given the drug, lamivudine, to 15 Ebola patients, and all but two survived. That’s about a 13% mortality rate.

Across West Africa, the virus has killed 70% of its victims.

Outside Logan’s Ebola center in Tubmanburg, four of his recovering patients walk the grounds, always staying inside the fence that separates the Ebola patients from everyone else.

“My stomach was hurting; I was feeling weak; I was vomiting,” Elizabeth Kundu, 23, says of her bout with the virus. “They gave me medicine, and I’m feeling fine. We take it, and we can eat — we’re feeling fine in our bodies.”

Photos: Ebola outbreak in West Africa

Residents of an Ebola-affected township take home kits distributed by Doctors Without Borders (MSF), on Saturday, October 4, in New Kru Town, Liberia. MSF gave out thousands of the kits to families throughout the capital area. The kits, which include buckets, soap, gloves, anti-contamination gowns, plastic bags, a spray bottle and masks, are meant to give people some level of protection if a family member becomes sick. Health officials say the Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the deadliest ever. More than 3,400 people have died, according to the World Health Organization.

A hazardous materials team cleans the Dallas apartment where four contacts of Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan are under quarantine on Friday, October 3. Duncan, the first person diagnosed with Ebola on American soil, contracted the virus in his home country of Liberia.A hazardous materials team cleans the Dallas apartment where four contacts of Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan are under quarantine on Friday, October 3. Duncan, the first person diagnosed with Ebola on American soil, contracted the virus in his home country of Liberia.
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A girl cries as community activists approach her outside her Monrovia, Liberia, home on Thursday, October 2, a day after her mother was taken to an Ebola ward.A girl cries as community activists approach her outside her Monrovia, Liberia, home on Thursday, October 2, a day after her mother was taken to an Ebola ward.
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Marie Nyan, whose mother died of Ebola, carries her 2-year-old son, Nathaniel Edward, to an ambulance in the Liberian village of Freeman Reserve on Tuesday, September 30.Marie Nyan, whose mother died of Ebola, carries her 2-year-old son, Nathaniel Edward, to an ambulance in the Liberian village of Freeman Reserve on Tuesday, September 30.
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A health official uses a thermometer Monday, September 29, to screen a Ukrainian crew member on the deck of a cargo ship at the Apapa port in Lagos, Nigeria.A health official uses a thermometer Monday, September 29, to screen a Ukrainian crew member on the deck of a cargo ship at the Apapa port in Lagos, Nigeria.
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Children pray during Sunday service at the Bridgeway Baptist Church in Monrovia on Sunday, September 28.Children pray during Sunday service at the Bridgeway Baptist Church in Monrovia on Sunday, September 28.
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Residents of the St. Paul Bridge neighborhood in Monrovia take a man suspected of having Ebola to a clinic on September 28.Residents of the St. Paul Bridge neighborhood in Monrovia take a man suspected of having Ebola to a clinic on September 28.
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Workers move a building into place as part of a new Ebola treatment center in Monrovia on September 28.Workers move a building into place as part of a new Ebola treatment center in Monrovia on September 28.
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Medical staff members at the Doctors Without Borders facility in Monrovia burn clothes belonging to Ebola patients on Saturday, September 27. Medical staff members at the Doctors Without Borders facility in Monrovia burn clothes belonging to Ebola patients on Saturday, September 27.
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A police officer patrols a road in Monrovia on September 27 after a body was found in the center of the city.A police officer patrols a road in Monrovia on September 27 after a body was found in the center of the city.
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Tents are set up as health control centers at an air base near the Senegalese capital of Dakar on September 27. After closing its borders on August 21, Senegal opened an air corridor to allow humanitarian aid to be delivered to the three areas most affected by the Ebola virus.Tents are set up as health control centers at an air base near the Senegalese capital of Dakar on September 27. After closing its borders on August 21, Senegal opened an air corridor to allow humanitarian aid to be delivered to the three areas most affected by the Ebola virus.
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A health worker in Freetown, Sierra Leone, sprays disinfectant around the area where a man sits before loading him into an ambulance on Wednesday, September 24. A health worker in Freetown, Sierra Leone, sprays disinfectant around the area where a man sits before loading him into an ambulance on Wednesday, September 24.
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People wait outside a new Ebola treatment center in Monrovia on Tuesday, September 23.People wait outside a new Ebola treatment center in Monrovia on Tuesday, September 23.
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Health workers in protective suits work outside an Ebola treatment center in Monrovia on September 23.Health workers in protective suits work outside an Ebola treatment center in Monrovia on September 23.
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Medics load an Ebola patient onto a plane at Sierra Leone's Freetown-Lungi International Airport on Monday, September 22.Medics load an Ebola patient onto a plane at Sierra Leone’s Freetown-Lungi International Airport on Monday, September 22.
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A team that handles the management of dead bodies prays with Saymon Kamara, far right, on September 22 in Monrovia. Kamara's mother died from complications of high blood pressure.A team that handles the management of dead bodies prays with Saymon Kamara, far right, on September 22 in Monrovia. Kamara’s mother died from complications of high blood pressure.
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A few people are seen in Freetown during a three-day nationwide lockdown on Sunday, September 21. In an attempt to curb the spread of the Ebola virus, people in Sierra Leone were told to stay in their homes.A few people are seen in Freetown during a three-day nationwide lockdown on Sunday, September 21. In an attempt to curb the spread of the Ebola virus, people in Sierra Leone were told to stay in their homes.
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A baby pig sleeps in front of an ambulance at the Connaught Hospital in Freetown on September 21.A baby pig sleeps in front of an ambulance at the Connaught Hospital in Freetown on September 21.
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Supplies wait to be loaded onto an aircraft at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport on Saturday, September 20. It was the largest single shipment of aid to the Ebola zone to date, and it was coordinated by the Clinton Global Initiative and other U.S. aid organizations.Supplies wait to be loaded onto an aircraft at New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport on Saturday, September 20. It was the largest single shipment of aid to the Ebola zone to date, and it was coordinated by the Clinton Global Initiative and other U.S. aid organizations.
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A volunteer health worker in Freetown talks with residents on how to prevent Ebola infection and identify symptoms of the virus on September 20. Bars of soap were also distributed.A volunteer health worker in Freetown talks with residents on how to prevent Ebola infection and identify symptoms of the virus on September 20. Bars of soap were also distributed.
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Police in Freetown guard a roadblock Friday, September 19, as the country began enforcing its three-day nationwide lockdown. Police in Freetown guard a roadblock Friday, September 19, as the country began enforcing its three-day nationwide lockdown.
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A student of the Sainte Therese school in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, looks at placards Monday, September 15, that were put up to raise awareness about the symptoms of the Ebola virus.A student of the Sainte Therese school in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, looks at placards Monday, September 15, that were put up to raise awareness about the symptoms of the Ebola virus.
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Members of a volunteer medical team wear protective gear before the burying of an Ebola victim Saturday, September 13, in Conakry, Guinea.Members of a volunteer medical team wear protective gear before the burying of an Ebola victim Saturday, September 13, in Conakry, Guinea.
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A child stops on a Monrovia street Friday, September 12, to look at a man who is suspected of suffering from Ebola.A child stops on a Monrovia street Friday, September 12, to look at a man who is suspected of suffering from Ebola.
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Health workers on Wednesday, September 10, carry the body of a woman who they suspect died from the Ebola virus in Monrovia.Health workers on Wednesday, September 10, carry the body of a woman who they suspect died from the Ebola virus in Monrovia.
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A woman in Monrovia carries the belongings of her husband, who died after he was infected by the Ebola virus.A woman in Monrovia carries the belongings of her husband, who died after he was infected by the Ebola virus.
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Five ambulances that were donated by the United States to help combat the Ebola virus are lined up in Freetown on September 10 following a ceremony that was attended by Sierra Leone President Ernest Bai Koroma.Five ambulances that were donated by the United States to help combat the Ebola virus are lined up in Freetown on September 10 following a ceremony that was attended by Sierra Leone President Ernest Bai Koroma.
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A health worker wears protective gear Sunday, September 7, at ELWA Hospital in Monrovia.A health worker wears protective gear Sunday, September 7, at ELWA Hospital in Monrovia.
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An ambulance transporting Dr. Rick Sacra, an American missionary who was infected with Ebola in Liberia, arrives at the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Nebraska, on Friday, September 5. Sacra was being treated in the hospital's special isolation unit.An ambulance transporting Dr. Rick Sacra, an American missionary who was infected with Ebola in Liberia, arrives at the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Nebraska, on Friday, September 5. Sacra was being treated in the hospital’s special isolation unit.
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Medical workers from the Liberian Red Cross carry the body of an Ebola victim Thursday, September 4, in Banjol, Liberia. Medical workers from the Liberian Red Cross carry the body of an Ebola victim Thursday, September 4, in Banjol, Liberia.
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Health workers in Monrovia place a corpse into a body bag on September 4.Health workers in Monrovia place a corpse into a body bag on September 4.
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A rally against the Ebola virus is held in Abidjan on September 4.A rally against the Ebola virus is held in Abidjan on September 4.
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After an Ebola case was confirmed in Senegal, people load cars with household items as they prepare to cross into Guinea from the border town of Diaobe, Senegal, on Wednesday, September 3.After an Ebola case was confirmed in Senegal, people load cars with household items as they prepare to cross into Guinea from the border town of Diaobe, Senegal, on Wednesday, September 3.
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Crowds cheer and celebrate in the streets Saturday, August 30, after Liberian authorities reopened the West Point slum in Monrovia. The military had been enforcing a quarantine on West Point, fearing a spread of the Ebola virus.Crowds cheer and celebrate in the streets Saturday, August 30, after Liberian authorities reopened the West Point slum in Monrovia. The military had been enforcing a quarantine on West Point, fearing a spread of the Ebola virus.
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A health worker wearing a protective suit conducts an Ebola prevention drill at the port in Monrovia on Friday, August 29. A health worker wearing a protective suit conducts an Ebola prevention drill at the port in Monrovia on Friday, August 29.
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Senegalese Health Minister Awa Marie Coll-Seck gives a news conference August 29 to confirm the first case of Ebola in Senegal. She announced that a young Guinean had tested positive for the deadly virus.Senegalese Health Minister Awa Marie Coll-Seck gives a news conference August 29 to confirm the first case of Ebola in Senegal. She announced that a young Guinean had tested positive for the deadly virus.
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Volunteers working with the bodies of Ebola victims in Kenema, Sierra Leone, sterilize their uniforms on Sunday, August 24. Volunteers working with the bodies of Ebola victims in Kenema, Sierra Leone, sterilize their uniforms on Sunday, August 24.
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A Liberian health worker checks people for symptoms of Ebola at a checkpoint near the international airport in Dolo Town, Liberia, on August 24.A Liberian health worker checks people for symptoms of Ebola at a checkpoint near the international airport in Dolo Town, Liberia, on August 24.
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A guard stands at a checkpoint Saturday, August 23, between the quarantined cities of Kenema and Kailahun in Sierra Leone.A guard stands at a checkpoint Saturday, August 23, between the quarantined cities of Kenema and Kailahun in Sierra Leone.
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A burial team from the Liberian Ministry of Health unloads bodies of Ebola victims onto a funeral pyre at a crematorium in Marshall, Liberia, on Friday, August 22.A burial team from the Liberian Ministry of Health unloads bodies of Ebola victims onto a funeral pyre at a crematorium in Marshall, Liberia, on Friday, August 22.
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A humanitarian group worker, right, throws water in a small bag to West Point residents behind the fence of a holding area on August 22. Residents of the quarantined Monrovia slum were waiting for a second consignment of food from the Liberian government.A humanitarian group worker, right, throws water in a small bag to West Point residents behind the fence of a holding area on August 22. Residents of the quarantined Monrovia slum were waiting for a second consignment of food from the Liberian government. (MC: doesn’t look authentic)
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Dr. Kent Brantly leaves Emory University Hospital on Thursday, August 21, after being declared no longer infectious from the Ebola virus. Brantly was one of two American missionaries brought to Emory for treatment of the deadly virus.Dr. Kent Brantly leaves Emory University Hospital on Thursday, August 21, after being declared no longer infectious from the Ebola virus. Brantly was one of two American missionaries brought to Emory for treatment of the deadly virus.
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Brantly, right, hugs a member of the Emory University Hospital staff after being released from treatment in Atlanta.Brantly, right, hugs a member of the Emory University Hospital staff after being released from treatment in Atlanta.
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Family members of West Point district commissioner Miata Flowers flee the slum in Monrovia while being escorted by the Ebola Task Force on Wednesday, August 20.Family members of West Point district commissioner Miata Flowers flee the slum in Monrovia while being escorted by the Ebola Task Force on Wednesday, August 20.
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An Ebola Task Force soldier beats a local resident while enforcing a quarantine on the West Point slum on August 20.An Ebola Task Force soldier beats a local resident while enforcing a quarantine on the West Point slum on August 20.
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Local residents gather around a very sick Saah Exco, 10, in a back alley of the West Point slum on Tuesday, August 19. The boy was one of the patients that was pulled out of a holding center for suspected Ebola patients after the facility was overrun and closed by a mob on August 16. A local clinic then refused to treat Saah, according to residents, because of the danger of infection. Although he was never tested for Ebola, Saah's mother and brother died in the holding center.Local residents gather around a very sick Saah Exco, 10, in a back alley of the West Point slum on Tuesday, August 19. The boy was one of the patients that was pulled out of a holding center for suspected Ebola patients after the facility was overrun and closed by a mob on August 16. A local clinic then refused to treat Saah, according to residents, because of the danger of infection. Although he was never tested for Ebola, Saah’s mother and brother died in the holding center.
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A burial team wearing protective clothing retrieves the body of a 60-year-old Ebola victim from his home near Monrovia on Sunday, August 17. A burial team wearing protective clothing retrieves the body of a 60-year-old Ebola victim from his home near Monrovia on Sunday, August 17.
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lija Siafa, 6, stands in the rain with his 10-year-old sister, Josephine, while waiting outside Doctors Without Borders' Ebola treatment center in Monrovia on August 17. The newly built facility will initially have 120 beds, making it the largest-ever facility for Ebola treatment and isolation. lija Siafa, 6, stands in the rain with his 10-year-old sister, Josephine, while waiting outside Doctors Without Borders’ Ebola treatment center in Monrovia on August 17. The newly built facility will initially have 120 beds, making it the largest-ever facility for Ebola treatment and isolation.
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Brett Adamson, a staff member from Doctors Without Borders, hands out water to sick Liberians hoping to enter the new Ebola treatment center on August 17.Brett Adamson, a staff member from Doctors Without Borders, hands out water to sick Liberians hoping to enter the new Ebola treatment center on August 17.
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Workers prepare the new Ebola treatment center on August 17.Workers prepare the new Ebola treatment center on August 17.
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A body, reportedly a victim of Ebola, lies on a street corner in Monrovia on Saturday, August 16. A body, reportedly a victim of Ebola, lies on a street corner in Monrovia on Saturday, August 16.
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Liberian police depart after firing shots in the air while trying to protect an Ebola burial team in the West Point slum of Monrovia on August 16. A crowd of several hundred local residents reportedly drove away the burial team and their police escort. The mob then forced open an Ebola isolation ward and took patients out, saying the Ebola epidemic is a hoax.Liberian police depart after firing shots in the air while trying to protect an Ebola burial team in the West Point slum of Monrovia on August 16. A crowd of several hundred local residents reportedly drove away the burial team and their police escort. The mob then forced open an Ebola isolation ward and took patients out, saying the Ebola epidemic is a hoax.
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A crowd enters the grounds of an Ebola isolation center in the West Point slum on August 16. The mob was reportedly shouting, "No Ebola in West Point."A crowd enters the grounds of an Ebola isolation center in the West Point slum on August 16. The mob was reportedly shouting, “No Ebola in West Point.”
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A health worker disinfects a corpse after a man died in a classroom being used as an Ebola isolation ward Friday, August 15, in Monrovia.A health worker disinfects a corpse after a man died in a classroom being used as an Ebola isolation ward Friday, August 15, in Monrovia.
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A boy tries to prepare his father before they are taken to an Ebola isolation ward August 15 in Monrovia.A boy tries to prepare his father before they are taken to an Ebola isolation ward August 15 in Monrovia.
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Kenyan health officials take passengers' temperature as they arrive at the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport on Thursday, August 14, in Nairobi, Kenya.Kenyan health officials take passengers’ temperature as they arrive at the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport on Thursday, August 14, in Nairobi, Kenya.
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A hearse carries the coffin of Spanish priest Miguel Pajares after he died at a Madrid hospital on Tuesday, August 12. Pajares, 75, contracted Ebola while he was working as a missionary in Liberia.A hearse carries the coffin of Spanish priest Miguel Pajares after he died at a Madrid hospital on Tuesday, August 12. Pajares, 75, contracted Ebola while he was working as a missionary in Liberia.
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A member of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads a training session on Ebola infection control Monday, August 11, in Lagos.A member of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads a training session on Ebola infection control Monday, August 11, in Lagos.
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Health workers in Kenema screen people for the Ebola virus on Saturday, August 9, before they enter the Kenema Government Hospital.Health workers in Kenema screen people for the Ebola virus on Saturday, August 9, before they enter the Kenema Government Hospital.
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A health worker at the Kenema Government Hospital carries equipment used to decontaminate clothing and equipment on August 9.A health worker at the Kenema Government Hospital carries equipment used to decontaminate clothing and equipment on August 9.
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Health care workers wear protective gear at the Kenema Government Hospital on August 9.Health care workers wear protective gear at the Kenema Government Hospital on August 9.
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Paramedics in protective suits move Pajares, the infected Spanish priest, at Carlos III Hospital in Madrid on Thursday, August 7. He died five days later.Paramedics in protective suits move Pajares, the infected Spanish priest, at Carlos III Hospital in Madrid on Thursday, August 7. He died five days later.
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Nurses carry the body of an Ebola victim from a house outside Monrovia on Wednesday, August 6.Nurses carry the body of an Ebola victim from a house outside Monrovia on Wednesday, August 6.
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A Nigerian health official wears protective gear August 6 at Murtala Muhammed International Airport in Lagos.A Nigerian health official wears protective gear August 6 at Murtala Muhammed International Airport in Lagos.
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Officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta sit in on a conference call about Ebola with CDC team members deployed in West Africa on Tuesday, August 5.Officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta sit in on a conference call about Ebola with CDC team members deployed in West Africa on Tuesday, August 5.
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Aid worker Nancy Writebol, wearing a protective suit, gets wheeled on a gurney into Emory University Hospital in Atlanta on August 5. A medical plane flew Writebol from Liberia to the United States after she and her colleague Dr. Kent Brantly were infected with the Ebola virus in the West African country. Aid worker Nancy Writebol, wearing a protective suit, gets wheeled on a gurney into Emory University Hospital in Atlanta on August 5. A medical plane flew Writebol from Liberia to the United States after she and her colleague Dr. Kent Brantly were infected with the Ebola virus in the West African country.
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Nigerian health officials are on hand to screen passengers at Murtala Muhammed International Airport on Monday, August 4.Nigerian health officials are on hand to screen passengers at Murtala Muhammed International Airport on Monday, August 4.
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A man gets sprayed with disinfectant Sunday, August 3, in Monrovia.A man gets sprayed with disinfectant Sunday, August 3, in Monrovia.
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Dr. Kent Brantly, right, gets out of an ambulance after arriving at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta on Saturday, August 2. Brantly was infected with the Ebola virus in Africa, but he was brought back to the United States for further treatment.Dr. Kent Brantly, right, gets out of an ambulance after arriving at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta on Saturday, August 2. Brantly was infected with the Ebola virus in Africa, but he was brought back to the United States for further treatment.
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Nurses wearing protective clothing are sprayed with disinfectant Friday, August 1, in Monrovia after they prepared the bodies of Ebola victims for burial.Nurses wearing protective clothing are sprayed with disinfectant Friday, August 1, in Monrovia after they prepared the bodies of Ebola victims for burial.
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A nurse disinfects the waiting area at the ELWA Hospital in Monrovia on Monday, July 28. A nurse disinfects the waiting area at the ELWA Hospital in Monrovia on Monday, July 28.
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Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, right, walks past an Ebola awareness poster in downtown Monrovia as Liberia marked the 167th anniversary of its independence Saturday, July 26. The Liberian government dedicated the anniversary to fighting the deadly disease. Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, right, walks past an Ebola awareness poster in downtown Monrovia as Liberia marked the 167th anniversary of its independence Saturday, July 26. The Liberian government dedicated the anniversary to fighting the deadly disease.
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In this photo provided by Samaritan's Purse, Dr. Kent Brantly, left, treats an Ebola patient in Monrovia. On July 26, the North Carolina-based group said Brantly tested positive for the disease. Days later, Brantly arrived in Georgia to be treated at an Atlanta hospital, becoming the first Ebola patient to knowingly be treated in the United States.In this photo provided by Samaritan’s Purse, Dr. Kent Brantly, left, treats an Ebola patient in Monrovia. On July 26, the North Carolina-based group said Brantly tested positive for the disease. Days later, Brantly arrived in Georgia to be treated at an Atlanta hospital, becoming the first Ebola patient to knowingly be treated in the United States.
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A 10-year-old boy whose mother was killed by the Ebola virus walks with a doctor from the aid organization Samaritan's Purse after being taken out of quarantine Thursday, July 24, in Monrovia.A 10-year-old boy whose mother was killed by the Ebola virus walks with a doctor from the aid organization Samaritan’s Purse after being taken out of quarantine Thursday, July 24, in Monrovia.
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A doctor puts on protective gear at the treatment center in Kailahun on Sunday, July 20.A doctor puts on protective gear at the treatment center in Kailahun on Sunday, July 20.
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Members of Doctors Without Borders adjust tents in the isolation area in Kailahun on July 20.Members of Doctors Without Borders adjust tents in the isolation area in Kailahun on July 20.
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Boots dry in the Ebola treatment center in Kailahun on July 20.Boots dry in the Ebola treatment center in Kailahun on July 20.
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Red Cross volunteers prepare to enter a house where an Ebola victim died in Pendembu, Sierra Leone, on Friday, July 18.Red Cross volunteers prepare to enter a house where an Ebola victim died in Pendembu, Sierra Leone, on Friday, July 18.
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Dr. Jose Rovira of the World Health Organization takes a swab from a suspected Ebola victim in Pendembu on July 18.Dr. Jose Rovira of the World Health Organization takes a swab from a suspected Ebola victim in Pendembu on July 18.
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Red Cross volunteers disinfect each other with chlorine after removing the body of an Ebola victim from a house in Pendembu on July 18.Red Cross volunteers disinfect each other with chlorine after removing the body of an Ebola victim from a house in Pendembu on July 18.
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A dressing assistant prepares a Doctors Without Borders member before entering an isolation ward Thursday, July 17, in Kailahun.A dressing assistant prepares a Doctors Without Borders member before entering an isolation ward Thursday, July 17, in Kailahun.
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A doctor works in the field laboratory at the Ebola treatment center in Kailahun on July 17.A doctor works in the field laboratory at the Ebola treatment center in Kailahun on July 17.
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Doctors Without Borders staff prepare to enter the isolation ward at an Ebola treatment center in Kailahun on July 17.Doctors Without Borders staff prepare to enter the isolation ward at an Ebola treatment center in Kailahun on July 17.
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A health worker with disinfectant spray walks down a street outside the government hospital in Kenema on Thursday, July 10. A health worker with disinfectant spray walks down a street outside the government hospital in Kenema on Thursday, July 10.
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Dr. Mohamed Vandi of the Kenema Government Hospital trains community volunteers who will aim to educate people about Ebola in Sierra Leone.Dr. Mohamed Vandi of the Kenema Government Hospital trains community volunteers who will aim to educate people about Ebola in Sierra Leone.
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Police block a road outside Kenema to stop motorists for a body temperature check on Wednesday, July 9.Police block a road outside Kenema to stop motorists for a body temperature check on Wednesday, July 9.
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A woman has her temperature taken at a screening checkpoint on the road out of Kenema on July 9.A woman has her temperature taken at a screening checkpoint on the road out of Kenema on July 9.
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A member of Doctors Without Borders puts on protective gear at the isolation ward of the Donka Hospital in Conakry on Saturday, June 28.A member of Doctors Without Borders puts on protective gear at the isolation ward of the Donka Hospital in Conakry on Saturday, June 28.
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Airport employees check passengers in Conakry before they leave the country on Thursday, April 10.Airport employees check passengers in Conakry before they leave the country on Thursday, April 10.
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CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta, left, works in the World Health Organization's mobile lab in Conakry. Gupta traveled to Guinea in April to report on the deadly virus.CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta, left, works in the World Health Organization’s mobile lab in Conakry. Gupta traveled to Guinea in April to report on the deadly virus.
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A Guinea-Bissau customs official watches arrivals from Conakry on Tuesday, April 8.A Guinea-Bissau customs official watches arrivals from Conakry on Tuesday, April 8.
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Egidia Almeida, a nurse in Guinea-Bissau, scans a Guinean citizen coming from Conakry on April 8. Egidia Almeida, a nurse in Guinea-Bissau, scans a Guinean citizen coming from Conakry on April 8.
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A scientist separates blood cells from plasma cells to isolate any Ebola RNA and test for the virus Thursday, April 3, at the European Mobile Laboratory in Gueckedou, Guinea.A scientist separates blood cells from plasma cells to isolate any Ebola RNA and test for the virus Thursday, April 3, at the European Mobile Laboratory in Gueckedou, Guinea.
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Members of Doctors Without Borders carry a dead body in Gueckedou on Friday, April 1. Members of Doctors Without Borders carry a dead body in Gueckedou on Friday, April 1.
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Gloves and boots used by medical personnel dry in the sun April 1 outside a center for Ebola victims in Gueckedou.Gloves and boots used by medical personnel dry in the sun April 1 outside a center for Ebola victims in Gueckedou.
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A health specialist works Monday, March 31, in a tent laboratory set up at a Doctors Without Borders facility in southern Guinea.A health specialist works Monday, March 31, in a tent laboratory set up at a Doctors Without Borders facility in southern Guinea.
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Article continued…..

Kundu and the other 12 patients who took the lamivudine and survived, received the drug in the first five days or so of their illness. The two patients who died received it between days five and eight.

“I’m sure that when [patients] present early, this medicine can help,” Logan said. “I’ve proven it right in my center.”

Two doctors for 85,000 people

Logan is mindful that lamivudine can cause liver and other problems, but he says it’s worth the risk since Ebola is so deadly.

He also knows American researchers will say only a real study can prove effectiveness. That would involve taking a much larger patient population and giving half of them lamivudine and the other half a placebo.

“Our people are dying and you’re taking about studies?” he said. “It’s a matter of doing all that I can do as a doctor to save some people’s lives.”

 Logan said he got the idea to try lamivudine when he read in scientific journals that HIV and Ebola replicate inside the body in much the same way.

“Ebola is a brainchild of HIV,” he said. “It’s a destructive strain of HIV.”

At first he tried a drug called acyclovir, which is often given to HIV patients to treat infections that occur with their weakened immune systems. But it didn’t seem to be effective. Then he tried lamivudine on a health care worker who’d become ill, and within a day or two he showed signs of improvement and survived.

One woman walked in, and the Ebola nightmare began

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases says that theoretically, Logan’s approach has some merit. Lamivudine is a nucleocide analog, and other drugs in this class are being studied to treat Ebola.

Fauci asked CNN to give Logan his email address, saying perhaps his lab could do some follow up work.

Logan says he plans to email Fauci this weekend.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/09/27/health/ebola-hiv-drug/index.html?iid=article_sidebar

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One woman walked in, and the Ebola nightmare began

By Adam Levine, Special to CNN

updated 2:07 PM EDT, Wed September 24, 2014

(CNN) — A middle-aged woman walked into the emergency room of Phebe Hospital with a fever on the evening of June 23.

Phebe was known as one of the best hospitals in rural Liberia, supported by the local government and international religious and academic partners. Phebe was especially known for its high-quality nursing care, serving as a training hospital for nearby Cuttington University, one of the country’s few nursing schools.

A few hours after arriving in the emergency room, the woman was admitted to the medicine ward with a list of potential infections — all the usual suspects in Bong County: malaria, typhoid, sepsis.

An epidemic had been raging for months in nearby Guinea, but Ebola was not considered as a possible diagnosis. After all, nobody at Phebe had ever seen a patient before with Ebola, and as the axiom goes in medicine, when you hear hoof beats, think horses, not zebras. Certainly don’t start imagining unicorns.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/09/24/health/ebola-epidemic-liberia/

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I would have liked some info on the where, when, how’s… of the woman who presented herself at the academically and medically advanced Phebe Hospital.

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NOTE: Lamivudine, by the way, is beyond its patent protection – anyone can make it. It’s also used to treat Hep B and other virus’. It just m;ight be prudent to give the drug to everyone suspected of being infected as a prophylaxis. And which DNA mutation of ebola does this vaccination counter? Ebola is an RNA virus and has no DNA. This vaccine is against the Zaire strain of Ebola. It should cover the West African variants of the virus as well as the Congo variants used to develop it. For all we’ve heard about the mutations, there really are not very many of them, those that exist are within the normal variability of virus that we expect, and the mutations affected the genetic material more than the structure of the virus. So the vaccine, if it performs well in testing, should be effective.

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Update:

Lamivudine is structurally related to favipiravir:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Favipiravir

Which is already being stockpiled in Japan for use in a flu outbreak:

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2014/08/08/national/science-health/ebola-drug-japan-may-emerge-among-key-candidates/

And has been shown to halt ebola in the lab:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24462697

Japan has offered its stockpile of enough doses to treat 20K patients to the WHO. Thusfar, crickets… since it’s off patent there’s no money to be made…I’m sure the US also has a pile but Bill Gates probably put a stop to it. A very small sample of 13 patients with zero fatalities from a disease that normally has a 68% mortality rate isn’t meaningless. For a disease with that mortality rate a double-blind controlled study comparing with a placebo would not only be unethical in terms of medical ethics, it would be flat-out immoral. Using the general infected population with its 68% mortality rate as a control group. Zero fatalities in a sample of 13 shows an effect significant at the p < 0.0000003 level of significance in comparison to standard treatments. When the effect is large enough it shows up in even small samples.

.

Bravo Dr. Logan and CNN for reporting this story! It would appear to be a very important story yet I haven’t seen any other news reports on it. It certainly needs to be discussed since it stands to save lives – what’s to lose by using this well-known drug on people within the first five days (or any days for that matter) other than Big Pharma Investors (Gates et al) who stand to lose big bucks.

.

WHO Worker contracts Ebola. Doctor who received ZMAPP Dies. Fatality Rate Increases to 70%.

Monday, August 25, 2014

For first time, a World Health Organization worker has fallen ill with Ebola

http://www.cnn.com/2014/08/24/world/africa/ebola-outbreak/index.html

An African doctor who received the experimental anti-Ebola drug ZMapp has died

http://www.theverge.com/2014/8/25/6065417/african-doctor-who-was-treated-experimental-anti-ebola-drug-dead

Doctor: Ebola Fatality Rate Running At 70 Percent — Seven out of 10 patients admitted for Ebola die

http://www.npr.org/2014/08/23/342652020/doctor-ebola-fatality-rate-running-at-70-percent?utm_content=buffer165fb&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

New hotbed of Ebola found in Congo as serum-treated doctor dies:

http://rt.com/news/182708-ebola-mzapp-dies-congo/?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

Investment Watch Blog ^

 

The patented ZMAPP (drug cocktail from tobacco plants) was unsuccessful (see above) in August, (though proved successful in September – two medics who worked in Liberia were transported back to the US with Ebola, treated w/ ZMAPP and supposedly cured). Thusfar it would appear that Dr Logan and the nonpatented Lamivudine has been more successful with the much cheaper and more readily available Lammivudine. Meanwhile the Corporate MSM is touting the cure-all  ZMAPP prompting thousands of Africans to apply for visas for the cure (currently numbers at 10,000 daily).

Note: The medics who were given ZMAPP also received a unit of blood Plasma w/ elements of ebola from …leaving one to  speculate as to which cured the medic(s)…

___________________________________

Scientists who study Ebola virus disease focus on vaccines or treatments that target the virus, but these interventions are still being developed and are available to only a few Ebola patients. These scientists and the health officials who rely on their advice ignore treatments that don’t prevent infection, but instead shore up host defenses and improve chances of survival. Other investigators who study patients with sepsis have shown that acute statin treatment reduces the risk of developing multi-organ failure by 83%, and multi-organ failure is what kills Ebola patients. Moreover, acute treatment with statins and other immunomodulatory agents (e.g., ACE inhibitors, ARBs) dramatically improves 30-day survival in patients hospitalized with pneumonia and sepsis. These generic agents are inexpensive and available to doctors in West Africa today. They are safe when given to patients with acute critical illness. They could be used to treat Ebola patients and to prevent complications in healthcare workers who become infected. This idea was discussed in an Op-Ed article published in The New York Times on August 15th and in an article published online in The Journal of Infectious Diseases on August 25th. Ebola scientists, investigators at NIH, WHO staff and the UN Coordinator for Ebola all know about it, but they have chosen to ignore it. Thus, Ebola patients and those who care for them are denied the hope that treatment with one or more of these agents could save their lives.

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